HOME   |   OUR PROPERTIES   |   POLICY   |    MEDICINE PARK   |   THE AREA   |   CONTACT US   |   MAP   |   LINKS

The Wichita Mountains are the oldest mountain range in North America and the result of over half a billion years of geologic history. 

The first known geologic event in this region took place 550 to 600 million years ago (Early of Middle Cambrian time). The land from northern Texas to north of the present Wichita Mountains sank, forming a basin which filled with sea water. 

Rivers carried clay, sand and gravel into this sea and thick layers of sediments were formed. Sometime after the deposition of the sediments, a hot lava formed at considerable depth below the surface in the Wichita area. The liquid was forced up into the overlying sediments and spread out between the sedimentary beds. The lava cooled slowly, forming a dark gray to black igneous rock known as gabbro.

The next major geologic event took place in the Middle Cambrian time (500 to 550 million years ago). A hot granite lava developed at considerable depth below the surface and was forced upwards into the overlying gabbro and also in part reached the surface through volcanic vents. The cooling of this hot liquid at depth formed a red granite which is the most extensive rock in the Wichitas. Mt. Scott is composed of this granite. 

The mountains of the Wichita region were formed some 300 million years ago (Pennsylvanian period). They were created by a tremendous uplift accompanied by large folds and faults. Some of the faults were miles in length and produced large blocks. Some of these settled with respect to others, and the large flat areas bordering the Scenic Highway in the central part of the Refuge probably originated by faulting. 

The mountains originally were considerably higher than the present ones - perhaps as high as the Rockies at one time. Erosion  stripped off the upper parts and deposited this material in the intervening flats, reducing the relief. Most of this erosion took place in Permian time (some 250 million years ago) and 

produced extensive gravel deposits. Remnants of these gravels may be seen north of Crater Lake, north of Lake Elmer Thomas, east and south of Lost Lake, and in several other parts of the Refuge. Granite is the dominant rock of the Refuge, and the gravels formed by erosion are mainly composed of granite fragments. There are unconsolidated well-rounded boulders 6 to 18 inches in diameter, known as cobblestones, surrounded by yellow-to-brown clay.

WICHITA MOUNTAINS WILDLIFE REFUGE

The Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge is the second most visited national wildlife refuge in the United States hosting more than 2 million annual visitors.   Established in 1901 by United States President Teddy Roosevelt, the Refuge is one of more than 530 refuges throughout the United States managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Refuge contains more than 59,000 acres of pristine beauty and provides habitat for large native grazing animals such as American Bison, Rocky Mountain elk, white-tailed deer, and Texas longhorn cattle. More than 50 mammal, 240 bird, 64 reptile and amphibian, 36 fish, and 806 plant species thrive on this important refuge.

The Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge - wild, rugged, and weathered - is a symbol of the old west standing at the threshold of modern times. For centuries, this remarkable land was the province of a nomadic hunters and food gatherers. Today, the Refuge serves all Americans by keeping in public trust a portion of our nation's wildlife heritage.

Through direct exposure to wildlife and wild lands, visitors experience a personal re-creation and a renewed commitment to the value of environmental stewardship. The natural attractions of the Refuge are many and varied. In addition to viewing and photographing wildlife in their natural setting, the lakes, streams, canyons, mountains, and grasslands provide visitors with an ideal setting for permitted outdoor activities.

 

 

The Medicine Park and Wichita Mountains area are home to great outdoor fun. Times are best spent cruising, hiking, biking, or just enjoying the beauty of the Wichitas --- on Lake Lawtonka swimming, fishing and skiing --- or just soaking up the area's ambiance.

Hiking | Fishing | Hunting | Lake Sports

The fishing is outstanding at Lake Lawtonka, Lake Elmer Thomas, any of the 20+ lakes on the Wildlife Refuge or even fly fishing for trout in Medicine Creek December thru March. Oklahoma State Fishing permits are required and a Medicine Park Fly Fishing Permit is required to fish Medicine Creek for trout. 

The Wichita Mountain Wildlife Refuge has great hiking trails, mountain biking trails, outstanding rock climbing areas, a terrific Visitor's Center and Museum and outstanding scenery for photographers!

The Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge hosts two of Oklahoma's most popular controlled hunts, the annual elk and deer hunts. The hunts are 2 1/2 days of exhilarating scenery and are known as some of the best-managed hunts in the country.

ASK US AT MEDICINE PARK CABINS ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR HUNTER'S 

Museums and More

The Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton aspires to open minds and enrich lives by exploring the spirit of the Great Plains.

<< HOME

NEXT>>

HOME   |   OUR PROPERTIES   |   POLICY   |    MEDICINE PARK   |   THE AREA   |   CONTACT US   |   MAP   |   LINKS

WEBSITE DESIGN BY: LAWTONKA MEDIA & CREATIVE